Media Literacy Week 2018

the-climate-reality-project-349084-unsplashThe focus for Media Literacy Week is Fake News and Fact Checking

For more information about this week, you can find more on the Media Smarts site medialiteracyweek.ca and follow #MediaLitWk on social media. You can also follow the #ONedSsChat hashtag for the growing student voice on this topic.

Some resources to support your Media Literacy week work.

Some Resources from Media Smarts Canada to support your fact checking and fake news detection skills.

Some resources from the University of South Carolina Library:

  • Fake News
    • Has a great video resource that can be used to fact check for fake news
    • Seven types of propaganda – infographic
  • Website evaluation using the STAAR framework – slant, topical, authority, accuracy, relevance – with downloadable PDF file and checklist/ fillable version
  • Analyzing a web URL – helps you determine if the site you’re checking has a legitimate web address.

I have to include Mike Caulfield’s open access Pressbook publication titled Web Literacy for Student Fact-Checkers – and other people who care about facts. This book introduces the 4 habits from the fact checking process – check for previous work, to upstream to the source, read laterally, and circle back (Caulfield, 2017). This resource may be better suited for older students or higher education contexts.

I’ll post additional resources as the week progresses.

ONedSsChat

I look forward to participating in the ONedSsChat on Friday morning.

This event is part of a month long conversation about Media Literacy.

How to spot fake news

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#DigCitSummitCA

What happens when you bring passionate educators together to talk about digital citizenship? A whole lot of deep thinking and rich conversations. The connections extended and expanded to others in diverse locations through active engagement on Twitter. These conversations will continue to ripple out from this event and impact many other digital citizenship discussions in days, weeks and the year to come.

My thanks to the organizing team for making this event happen. There is a need for these conversations, and this day delivered! Take a look at the DigCitSummitCA web site. Reach out, connect and collaborate with any one of the listed speakers. The repository of presentation notes is open and available too.

Some highlights from my day:

  • Screen Shot 2018-10-28 at 9.03.13 AMfinally meeting Stephen Hurley and watching him engage voices from the DigCitSummitCA with an unseen and unknown audience. His passion for VoiceEd Canada is exemplary and his motto “your voice is right here” was evident.
  • meeting Noa Daniel for the first time, after spending so much time in conversations through a variety of media. She truly is a change agent, and a passion driven teacher and learner. I eagerly listened as she shared about the pilot project for OnEDMentorsConnect which is just heading into a second phase for connected, participatory mentorship for new educators beyond the boundaries of schools or systems.
  • engaging with Allison Fuisz (from a coffee shop in Ottawa), Brock Baker and Jennifer Casa Todd to learn more about the @ONedSsChat willingly sharing how to set up and manage a class twitter account. The students who joined the conversation are powerfully presenting their passion for connections and conversations beyond the walls of their physical locations. I’m looking forward to participating in their next chat focusing on fake news and fact checking, being held during Media Literacy Week (#MediaLitWk) an annual event that is planned and supported by Media Smarts Canada.

  • having a conversation with Matthew Johnson, Director of Education from Media Smarts Canada about the latest research report – The Digital Well Being of Canadian Families –  and the ongoing work to promote and advocate media literacy education in Canada for teachers and educators – check out the Digital Literacy 101 for Teachers that has been developed and openly shared for use by educators, for educators across Canada, and beyond.
  • learning with Julie Millan about building a digital presence as a professional. She challenged us to think about how we include digital citizenship work in how we do this. Her presentation notes – Go Google Yourself!
    • earning about @McM_MsT and digging into permissions vs restrictions in building an online user agreement written by students
    • writing a ‘persuade me’ letter to use Google Classroom for ‘fun stuff’
    • take one classroom event to embed an element of digital citizenship
    • teaching about the power of LIKE and how ‘likes’ in social media impacts mental health and self esteem
    • sharing the site ‘I know where your cat lives‘ as a way to talk about geo-location settings
    • being aware of your digital shadows – how do Google and Facebook know it’s your birthday?
    • think before you click and click with compassion, with classroom posters available in French (Thx Larissa Aradj) as well as English
  • having a chance to talk to Sharon Drummond about the possibility of dropping into my class through a video conference session to talk share her sketch noting skills and how they tie into teaching and personal learning
  • having a rich discussion about open education pedagogies and practices with Lillian Rigling, Sue Kwiecien, Andy Kwiecien, Patrick Miller, Noa Daniel, Rebecca Chambers, and others.
  • reconnecting with Yana Bauer and meeting Neely Powell to continue building digital connections despite physical distances
  • meeting up with Diane Maliszewski and sharing our interest in media education and @A_M_L connections, and reading her blog reflection on Monday Molly Musings.

After an event or conference, I take time to step back, look at the impact that speakers, presentations, and topics have on my thinking, my teaching, and my connections. These will continue to impact digital citizenship conversations in my classroom and for my students.

Thanks Jennifer Casa Todd for sharing your reflections today.

What strikes me today, as I reflect, is that the dust isn’t and shouldn’t settle! Just as Jennifer Casa-Todd reflected, these conversations need to continue, spread, and gain momentum. If this was the first DigCitSummitCA, I’m looking forward to seeing how this evolves and grows into next year’s event – with additional willing hands and voices to make this happen! I thank all those who worked tirelessly and supported financially to make this year’s event happen.

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Digital Citizenship Summit, Canada

PresentingI’m excited to be speaking at the first every Digital Citizenship Summit held in Canada. It’s being held in Toronto with a number of well known speakers and thinkers in the K-20+ digital citizenship spaces and places. It’s an opportunity to come together to have conversations about challenging topics, in these days of fake news and fact checking.

The other reason I’m excited about this event is that I’m holding a conversation rather than a presentation. It’s going to focus around citizenship as an open pedagogical practice. Rather than preparing a set of slides with information, I’ve set up some questions to guide the collaboration during the time we’re together. With references to some key resources, we’ll take a closer look at how shifting our students into open learning spaces and places can support our work to build citizenship into our teaching practices. Here’s a peek at the slides and I’ll add a link so you can access the information after the summit is over.

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I’m looking forward to learning lots from those who’ll join me in this conversation. I’m excited to listen while others talk during this focused event.

If you’d like to learn more, check out the speakers list, and follow along with the hashtag on Twitter – #digcitsummitca

This is the beginning of great conversations to come. Other places these conversations are happening:

Resources from my notes:

 

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#WOLO and Radical Hospitality

I’ve blogged about hospitality before, and even tried to define this notion of radical hospitality. It’s coming back into my thinking as I begin working on the Mozilla Open Leadership Project (@Mozilla Open Leaders) with fellow Virtually Connecting collaborators Rebecca Hogue, Nate Angell and Wendy Taleo. We’re heading into week three of this fourteen week project, with loads more questions and complicated thinking happening.

This post was prompted by Wendy’s blog post [Buddy’s Friend: A Vision for Virtually Connecting] where she says “we have a clear understanding of what questions currently exist and that we want to encourage our brand of radical hospitality”.  I turned to wonder – what exactly is this notion of radical hospitatlity? This has been asked on a number of occasions over the past few weeks, so I’m going back to reflect and hopefully bring this notion of radical hospitality forward for more conversation. Grounding our Mozilla Open Leaders project in our shared understanding of ‘radical hospitality’ may lead us to questions or solutions yet to be discovered.

Here’s how I envisioned hospitality within the Virtually Connecting Community [Hospitality Revisited blog post from December, 2015], with a graphic adaptation from an article I’d read, which unfortunately I did not include in the post or image.

Radical Hospitality

I began with an internet search. There’s a course on hospitality – see the syllabus attached to the course description at the Toronto School of Theology. From this document, I discovered additional texts to support this personal inquiry.

  • Derrida, Jacques, Of Hospitality
  • Leddy, Mary Jo, Radical Gratitude
  • Still, Judith, Derrida and Hospitality: Theory and Practice
  • Wrobleski, Jessica, The Limits of Hospitality

From this exploration comes ‘aporia’ “a philosophical puzzle or state of puzzlement and in rhetoric a rhetorically useful expression of doubt.” Wikipedia  I’ve posted this on Wendy’s blog, to capture the ideas presented in this video about Derrida’s philosophy (viewing from 6:30 to 7:15).

More reading and searching led me to this article – Jacques Derrida on the ethics of hospitality. Further to this, an article discussing the ‘antimony of hospitality’ [OF HOSPITALITY: ANNE DUFOURMANTELLE INVITES JACQUES DERRIDA TO RESPOND] brings forward the question of ‘others’ and ‘othering’ which is a positional perspective I’ve recently explored in some course specific research reading, relating to Indigenous research methodologies. Continuing to explore, I discovered a book [Radical Hospitality: Benedict’s Way of Love: Benedict’s Way of Love, 2nd Edition] which may need a read.

In the end, I’ve found inspiration from this Ted Talk by Gareth Jenkins, Design Makes a Difference. As I watched, I considered the parallels to what we hope to accomplish within this Mozilla Open Leaders project for the Virtually Connecting Community. As a Canadian, I enjoyed the comments made at the 3:52 mark in the talk.

While this Mozilla Open Leaders project shifts forward, I’m reflecting on how this project with Virtually Connecting fits into the vision established by Mozilla for this work, and the greater purpose, that of internet health. Will our pondering, wondering, aporia moments help others build a better internet, one that is a little more radical in it’s hospitality across global contexts? I’ll continue to reflect here and on the GitHub issue set up for this project, along with other digital spaces where we’ll work together to operationalize this conception of radical hospitality.

 

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Happiness in teaching

I’ve been doing this ‘first day of school’ experience for many, many years. It’s always the same, and yet it’s always so different. There’s the anticipation, the excitement, the nervous energy, the dreams that drive the passion, and the preparation before the students arrive. Then the happiness happens! The students stream in and sit down. Eyes turn to you, and it begins. I take a deep breath, release it slowly, and get things rolling.

What I do next has changed every year, with every new class, with the individuals in the room. Even though it’s been planned, I shift and adjust as the group responds. I make fluid decisions as we work together to learn about each other. The activities are the catalyst for the conversations and relationships that we need to co-construct. These will begin on the first day, and build into the first week, to extend into a year of learning together. The first day, and the first week, is where happiness in teaching should happen.

IMG_3945There are many educators who believe that the first month should be one of rules and routines. “Don’t smile until December” is something I’ve heard often enough! That’s one ‘rule’ I’m willing to break, in my effort to build relationship and get to know my students on a personal level. Learning their names, even when it’s a large group, is so important. Structuring the climate of the classroom is also important – will there be engagement and fun, or will it be work first, laugh later? I’m happy to say, my students already know my weakness for a chuckle, and my bias about the term ’21st Century’. IMG_3947There’s been some serious thinking happening in the first week of work, some shifting in the seats as we tackle some complex concepts – just how do you define media or digital literacy? just what is this critical digital literacy thing all about? But when you start your course or your class with shoe selfies stories and lego mini-fig fun, you can’t help but feel happiness in the media making moments!

As I begin to learn about these students, who will learn with me in the coming months or year, I look at the happiness each one will bring to their own classrooms in the future – since my students are preservice teachers, also called teacher candidates. They will bring happiness into their classrooms if they’ve experienced happiness in their own learning. I’m not saying there won’t be tough topics and challenging times ahead. We all know it’s going to be complex and complicated. That’s the nature of this work we call teaching. But the happiness and joy of ‘learning’ should be in the mix of events or activities that are planned. There should be opportunities for student agency and ownership, choice and voice, immersed into the classroom tasks. As students engage with topics, there are moments to move beyond the mundane, and connect to positive emotions in the work being done. Where do they find happiness in learning and when do you find happiness in your teaching?

This image of joy helps – the Dalai Lama talks to Bishop Desmond Tutu about this topic!

What’s your ‘happiness is’ moment in your classroom teaching context?

Where do you find those ‘eyes wide open’ moments in your teaching?

Leave a comment below to share a first days of school “happiness is…” moment.

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CC Certification – use and create

6819454104_12c8bbd9c7_oIn Unit 4 of the Creative Commons Certification course, topics include using CC licensed works, choosing and applying a CC license, considerations after selecting a CC license, and remixing CC licensed works. Each section extends my understanding of what it means to create and share with Creative Commons licensing in mind. With a specific focus on what ‘no derivatives’ means, and how it limits the sharing of adaptations in open access and OER, I am now able to visualize how to use and apply the ND licensing designation. The metaphor used in this module, of creating a smoothie or a TV dinner style production helps clarify the difference between an adaptation and a collection. Thanks to Nate Angell‘s description, it’s making more sense now.

With the module discussions and quizzes completed, it was time to create and use with CC licensed materials. I decided to try producing a course trailer, a teaser, for one of the upcoming courses I teach. I searched for a creative way to present some basic information to engage students while entertaining them about media and digital literacies. After some searching, I settled on using lego mini-figures to tell a story about the course, aiming for a 60 second video clip with music and text. Collecting a variety of images from Pixabay and Unsplash was fairly easy, while the sequence of the story started to evolve, based on the images I was finding.

4.4.3 cc compatabilityTo fulfill the requirements of the assignment for this module, I searched Flickr for CC licensed images as well. As a result of the CC compatibility chart that was presented in this module, I was aware of the types of licensed materials I would gather. Here it became more challenging since I limited my search to only images that were CC-BY, because I wanted to license the resulting video as CC-BY, as well as make image annotations to enhance the video production. Many of the images I found were SA, NC, or ND licensed, so they were not selected for this project. As I collected images, I kept a running record that included a brief image description, T.A.S.L (title, author, source, license) information, and annotations created. I used this to create the sequenced image listing for the completed video, in order of appearance. I posted this image listing in a view-only location, and attached the link on the final video.

Locating an engaging audio track was next. Again, I limited my search on Free Music Archive to CC0 or CC-BY instrumental tracks that were just over one minute in length. Getting caught in the listening enjoyment of so many possible tracks, to make a decision, was the biggest challenge. So many to chose from!

The last task was to pull it all together, make some strategic image annotations to engage the ‘viewer’, trim each image and text feature to meet the projected time limits, create a lead-in title, list the CC-BY licensed images in the rolling credits, and produce the final video. Job accomplished! Here is the video trailer I’ve created, licensed CC-BY, 4.0:

The full listing of all images and resources can be found in the information section of the video and also linked here.

Image Attribution:

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CC Certification – NC and SA

Both the Non-Commercial (NC) restriction of the Creative Commons licenses and the Share-Alike (SA) condition of the licenses are poorly understood by many CC users. I’ll use my current context as a teacher educator to respond to these prompts, since it will help me clarify and communicate this information to colleagues and students.

  1. How would explain the issues with NC to a person choosing to use a CC license for the first time? 

ncCreative Commons licensing that designates works as non-commercial means that anyone using those materials cannot make ANY money for the reuse or reprinting of that content. As a teacher educator, employed in a higher education institution, I need to consider possible scenarios where money could be made using course materials I create that includes items designated with an NC license. For example:

  • I can use NC licensed materials in my course content, only if I am not making any money from this work (not including the remuneration I receive as an instructor).
  • If I were to charge additional funds for these course materials or sell additional services from these materials, I could not use any items with an NC license designation.
  • As an educator, I cannot make any money if I print OER materials for my students that contain NC licensed images or content. This must be done on a cost recovery basis only.
  • If I am asked to present for a local organization, even for a few minutes, even if it’s done with remuneration in kind, I cannot use any materials or content, or anything I use for that purpose, that has an NC designation.
  • If I will be making money on a publication or book chapter I create, I cannot use anything that has an NC license attached.
  1. How would you explain the way SA works to a person choosing to use a CC license for the first time?

saThe share-alike (SA) Creative Commons license designation is a way to say to others – this is my work, I’m sharing it with you, if you use it, you need to share it too! This is a way to ensure your work as an author, artist, creator, is also shared by others who may use your works in a remix or revision. When SA is present on a shared work, those who use that image, icon, music clip or creation are required to also share their version of what they’ve created with your material. This ensures a sustainable, sharing culture and enriches your credibility as a creator, in that your original work is attributed in each new version.

As a teacher educator, I can revise and remix materials that are SA, and share them openly, with attribution, as part of my course materials. If these materials are published openly on a course site, then your works, as the original creator, are forever linked to my remixed revisions. If these remixes are posted to an LMS site (learning management site) for student use, I need to also consider posting to an open URL location (blog, website, Instagram, Flickr, etc.) in order to ensure that I am honouring the spirit and intention of the CC SA license. It’s a provocation to share-alike, but one that cannot be denied, since it’s a layer over your rights as the copyright holder.

CC SA meme

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Anatomy of a CC License

This video production is part of the Creative Commons Certification course. This assignment submission is a brief anatomy of CC licenses, the three layers, the four elements, the six combinations, and includes some basic information about the CC license generator. There is more about how CC licenses are impacted by fair use, CC Zero designations, and works in the public domain.

The two images of the Creative Commons lapel pins are

  1. “CC lapel pins” flickr photo by hj_dewaard https://flickr.com/photos/143825674@N02/30064665718 shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license
  2. “CC lapel pins B&W” flickr photo by hj_dewaard https://flickr.com/photos/143825674@N02/43215144834 shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license

This video is Creative Commons licensed. All images, music and text are attributed at the end of the video and are CC-BY. The music is licensed CC-BY-NC.

Creative Commons License
Anatomy of a CC License by H.J. DeWaard is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at Adobe Spark.

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